If you want to import a vehicle, legally, contact: ImportAVehicle.com

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Navistar Inc. fined $250,000 for violating state air emissions regulations



Navistar Inc. fined $250,000 for violating state air emissions
regulations

$62,500 to help clean up school buses throughout the state

SACRAMENTO - Navistar Inc. paid $250,000 in penalties to the Air
Resources Board for failing to follow proper testing procedures
for one of its diesel exhaust filters, as required by state law.

“Companies that are in the business of providing pollution
control technology for vehicles must make sure that their
products actually do what they say they will do,” said ARB’s new
Enforcement Chief, Todd Sax.  “Navistar sold diesel particulate
filters in California without proper testing at specified
intervals, in violation of our air quality laws. To their credit,
once they were notified of these infractions, they took prompt
action and cooperated fully with ARB.”

The state’s Verification Procedure requires compliance testing
for each category of diesel particulate filters after a certain
number of units are sold or leased in the California market.
Results of these tests must be submitted to ARB’s Executive
Officer after each phase of testing in the form of a compliance
report.

Navistar failed to follow the in-use compliance requirements of
the Verification Procedure for the DPX™ Catalyzed Soot Filter
System. The company had sold more than 200 in California, with
many installed on school buses in the San Diego County region,
which should have triggered the required testing.

Illinois-based Navistar has agreed to follow all required
procedures and paid $187,500 to the Air Pollution Control fund to
support air quality research, and $62,500 to the San Joaquin
Valley Air Pollution Control District to clean up school bus
fleets throughout the state.

Diesel exhaust contains a variety of harmful gases and more than
40 other known cancer-causing compounds. In 1998, California
identified diesel particulate matter as a toxic air contaminant
based on its potential to cause cancer, premature death and other
health problems.

Sunday, July 5, 2015

Is It Legal to Drive A Right Hand Drive Car in the United States?

Right hand drive NISMO R32 GT-R

Is it legal to drive a right hand drive car(RHD) in America?

 Yes

11. Importing a right-hand drive vehicle.

In order to be lawfully manufactured or imported for sale in the U.S., a motor vehicle must comply with all applicable FMVSS issued by NHTSA. It is possible for a right-hand drive (RHD) vehicle to be manufactured in compliance with the FMVSS.

There is nothing specifically in the FMVSS(Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards) that talks about the position of the driver, they just say that there must be standardized controls and displays.  This is another one of those things I see repeated by people with no real knowledge of the US rules and regulations.

People get the import laws, title, registration, individual state regulations mixed up. It all is confusing.

 Some examples of vehicles manufactured in compliance with FMVSS are right hand drive garbage trucks, and mail cars.Vehicles over 25 years old are NHTSA exempt from Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards.



Cars sold in the US are left hand drive because that is the way it has been done since Ford in 1908.

"Early American motor vehicles, however, were right-hand drive, following the practice established by horse-drawn buggies. This changed in the early years of the 20th century: Ford changed to LHD production in 1908 with the Model T"

About 2/3's of the World uses left hand drive cars, and drives on the right.  "Today about 66.1% of the world's people live in right-hand traffic countries and 33.9% in left-hand traffic countries. About 72% of the world's total road distance carries traffic on the right, and 28% on the left." -Wikipedia

The NHTSA Import Eligibilty List, showing the stance on right hand drive cars.

11. Importing a right-hand drive vehicle.

In order to be lawfully manufactured or imported for sale in the U.S., a motor vehicle must comply with all applicable FMVSS issued by NHTSA. It is possible for a right-hand drive (RHD) vehicle to be manufactured in compliance with the FMVSS.

A motor vehicle that was not originally manufactured to comply with all applicable FMVSS, and/or was not so certified by its original manufacturer, in the form of a label permanently affixed to the vehicle, cannot be lawfully imported into the U.S. unless it is determined eligible for importation by NHTSA. The agency makes these decisions on the basis of a petition from an RI. These are business entities that are specifically approved by NHTSA to import nonconforming vehicles and to perform the necessary modifications on those vehicles so that they conform to all applicable FMVSS. The petitions must specify that the vehicle is substantially similar to a vehicle that was certified by its original manufacturer as conforming to all applicable FMVSS and is capable of being readily altered to conform to those standards, or, if there is no substantially similar U.S.-certified vehicle, that the vehicle has safety features that comply with, or are capable of being altered to comply with, the FMVSS based on destructive test information or other evidence the agency deems adequate.

As previously indicated, an import eligibility decision can be based on the substantial similarity of a non-U.S. certified vehicle to a vehicle manufactured for importation and sale in the United States, and so certified by its original manufacturer. If the vehicle you are seeking to import is a RHD, even if there were a U.S.-certified left-hand version of that vehicle, it might not be considered "substantially similar" for import eligibility purposes. Our experience has shown that the safety performance of RHD vehicles is not necessarily the same as that of apparently similar left-hand drive vehicles offered for sale in this country. However, NHTSA will consider the vehicles "substantially similar" if the manufacturer advises the agency in writing, on the manufacturer’s letterhead (and not that of an authorized dealership or other such entity affiliated with the manufacturer) that the RHD vehicle would perform the same as the U.S.-certified left-hand drive vehicle in crash tests. Absent such evidence, the petitioning RI would have to demonstrate that the vehicle, when modified, would comply. In this case, you might want to contact one or more of the RIs listed on our website to obtain their opinion on the feasibility of conforming the RHD vehicle to the FMVSS, and the costs involved in conforming the vehicle and petitioning NHTSA for a determination as to whether the vehicle is eligible for importation.




We have never seen anything in writing specifically regarding right hand drive in an individual states rules. If anyone knows of any, please put a link in the comments.


Monday, February 9, 2015

Nonconforming Motor Vehicles That Are Eligible For Importation (By Or Through A Registered Importer) October 2014

Nonconforming Motor Vehicles That Are Eligible  For Importation (By Or Through A Registered Importer)  October 2014


Under 49 U.S.C. § 30112(a), a person may not permanently import into the United States a motor vehicle manufactured after the date that an applicable Federal motor vehicle safety standard (FMVSS) takes effect unless the vehicle complies with the standard and is so certified by its original manufacturer. This prohibition applies to both new and used motor vehicles, but does not apply to motor vehicles that are at least 25 years old (based on the month and year of manufacture).

Vehicles over 25 years old.
All eligibility numbers are for left-hand drive motor vehicles except where the initials "RHD," signifying right-hand drive, appear in the model type column. While there is no specific restriction on importing a right-hand drive vehicle, these may not be imported under eligibility decisions based on the existence of substantially similar U.S.-certified left-hand drive vehicles. Our experience has shown that the safety performance of right-hand drive vehicles is not necessarily the same as that of apparently similar left-hand drive vehicles offered for sale in this country. However, we will consider the vehicles "substantially similar" if the manufacturer advises us that the right-hand drive vehicle would perform the same as the U.S.-certified left-hand drive vehicle in dynamic crash tests. Absent such a showing, the RI would have to demonstrate (through a petition) that the vehicle, when modified, would comply with all applicable Federal motor vehicle safety standards, including those for which dynamic crash testing is prescribed.

Thursday, February 5, 2015

Mississippi Man Admits to Smuggling S15 Silvia

Nissan Silva S15
Here is another example of a vehicle, imported incorrectly, registered in a state, eventually catching up to someone.  As any news article, they always seem just a little off in some areas - "the car is right hand drive." Even though it is true the car is right hand drive, it doesn't necessarily make the car illegal. 

They say that he is facing 20 years, and up to a $250,000 fine.  Pretty harsh for a car. They did mention that he sold the car, even after a federal agent told him not to.  There are many ways to illegally import a car, and just a few ways to do it correctly.
http://www.importavehicle.info/2011/11/is-my-imported-car-legal.html


GULFPORT -- An Ocean Springs man has pleaded guilty to a federal charge of smuggling into the United States an illegally imported car made in Japan, court records show.
A federal grand jury indicted Kendall Noble, 31, on four counts of wire fraud and one count of smuggling in the case. In exchange for the plea, the three wire fraud charges were dismissed.
Noble is set for sentencing today. He faces a maximum prison term of up to 20 years and up to a $250,000 fine.
According to the indictment, Noble knew a 2001 Nissan Silvia he brought to South Mississippi did not meet Department of Transportation and Environmental Protection Agency standards. In addition, the car is a right-hand drive.
Noble allegedly arranged for a third party to fraudulently register the car in Mississippi
Homeland Security Agents said Noble made fraudulent claims when he had someone register the car in Mississippi and later sold it to a South Carolina resident in 2011 despite a federal agent telling him he could not sell the car.
The wire fraud centered around $5,135 in payment reportedly sent to Noble's checking account over an eight-month period.

Source: http://www.sunherald.com/2015/01/27/6041245_ocean-springs-man-admits-smuggling.html?rh=1 

Read more here: http://www.sunherald.com/2015/01/27/6041245_ocean-springs-man-admits-smuggling.html?rh=1#storylink=cpy

 
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